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How your first grad role will ensure your in good stead

Commencing a role in a graduate field is often met with a degree of trepidation or uncertainty.

It's easy to see why. You've just finished university and you're about to change the makeup of your day somewhat. Gone are the days of working on an assignment at your own pace. It's now time to work in a unit of people to the beat of your boss's drum. But that isn't necessarily a bad thing - it's just a different way of operating. Here are a few things you learn from your first graduate role.

Routine is important

Unless you were super-organised, the university lifestyle was probably less rigid than that of a 9-5 workplace (not to say that you didn't work hard). When you land your first graduate job, it is very important that you learn to centre your week around the daytime. This means you may have to cut out early hours Netflix bingeing or midweek clubbing. After a week or two, you'll get into a regime, allowing yourself to be fully alert and focused when you're at work.

Getting into a routine is ideal for a productive day

Getting into a routine is ideal for a productive day

Planning is essential

Routine and planning go hand in hand. You'll learn this very early on. One of the best things to aid you in your organisation is simply to purchase a diary and write down any tasks or assignments that you need to do and tick them off as you go. It's been done for centuries and is still an essential part of the working day, especially in helping with reminding you to do future duties.

Get a diary and fill it

Get a diary and fill it

Listening is vital

Working alone in a library or your room may have left you feeling pretty adept at independent working, which is great. However, when you work in a graduate position you will more than likely be part of a team with a senior member of staff supervising over it. It is vital when in this group to listen to each to make sure you all on the same page.

Always give your colleagues and boss your full ear

Always give your colleagues and boss your full ear

Asking questions is key

Being vocal when unsure about something you've been tasked with isn't something to shy away from. Remaining silent and misinterpreting what you've been told to do is much more detrimental. Not only is it key to ask questions to gain a fuller understanding, it also shows how engaged you are with the company and that you are switched on and focused.

There's no shame in querying an assignment

There's no shame in querying an assignment

Be ready to try new things

There are many skills you learn and embolden when you complete a degree and the time will come where you will have to put these into practice. A salient attribute that many grads glean from higher education is how to be malleable. This will be a great benefit in the workplace as you will be asked to come out of your comfort zone and think quickly on your feet. If you are positive and roll with the punches, you will be able to tackle anything.

Thinking on your feet is an admirable trait

Thinking on your feet is an admirable trait

You're not expected to be perfect when you start your first graduate role, and many will be entry level, so your colleagues will know you won't be able to do everything right away. Try to think affirmatively and acknowledge the aforementioned tips and you should be in good stead with your employer.











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